Easing into Spring and Planning a Dye Garden

Flower seed packets

With more daylight and warmer temps, I am ready to get out in the yard to do spring clean up and begin putting in place all the garden ideas I’ve dreamed up over winter. Here in the Midwest, though, we often slip back into winter for a day here and there in March and April. Like the last few days. So, I’m reminding myself to slow down and ease into spring.

One of the first projects on my list is to plant a small dye garden. Plants I’m including are Zinnias, Bachelor’s Buttons, Clary Sage, Marigolds, and several other plants already in the perennial bed. While it is very much an experiment this year from beginning to end, I feel like even if the dyeing process doesn’t produce colors quite as I had hoped, they will still be interesting.

If you are contemplating a dye garden this summer, check with your local hardware or garden center for seeds. A couple of my favorite online sources for seeds and information include Seed Savers Exchange and Floret. With so many people planting gardens these days, I have found local stores to have the most selection at this juncture. That said, online sources are restocking as they can.

Another benefit of growing these flowers – fresh-cut flowers for inside the house through fall and last minute bouquets to drop off with friends and family!

Follow along on Facebook and Instagram – @YvonneMaloneStudio – to see photos of how this project unfolds in the coming months.

Hidden Messages

Handmade cotton clothing label

You probably know that feeling of surprise when you find a treasure tucked away in the pocket of a jacket that you’ve not worn for several seasons. Like a rock picked up at the beach or on a family hike. You pull it out and remember the day – who you were with, the conversation, the relaxing feel of just wandering. It makes you smile – and you might just decide to leave it there as a reminder of what is most valuable.

From time to time, I’ll write down a quote and tuck it away in my planner. The quote often brings me back to center when I’ve been going a hundred miles an hour. I think of these items we randomly collect and drop into a pocket, a zippered pocket of a purse… as hidden messages to ourselves.

You may have seen a hidden message of sorts in handmade garments in vintage stores or even stitched a label into garments and accessories you’ve made. A message that reads something like “Made Expressly for You by the maker’s first name.” How wonderful to slip the garment on knowing the maker stitched in a lot of warmth and love as they knitted the sweater as a birthday gift, a back-to-school outfit, or simply because.

The coat Jill Biden wore on the evening of President Joe Biden’s Inauguration included a quote embroidered into the lining: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” The quote, from Benjamin Franklin, is meaningful to her as an educator. And, it was something to “carry with her” on the historic day.

Quiltmakers often include a label on the back of a quilt with their name and the date. When working on a commission, I ask clients if there is a sentiment they would like to include on a separate label. Many provide one, especially if the quilt is to be a gift.

So, here’s a small project – or a big one, depending on how you run with it! Make some labels to stitch into your own clothes, your child’s, a partner’s… 

  • Include a family motto, a simple drawing, a quote, or a personal sentiment.
  • Decide on whether you will use fabric markers or embroidery to make the design.
  • Play with cotton fabric scraps, pieces of felt, buttons, and ribbon as you design your label(s). 
  • Consider the orientation of the label before stitching. For example, do you want the wearer to be able to view it when wearing the garment or just when they slip it on.
  • Select materials and determine size based on where you want to stitch the label and how it will be washed. For example, avoid anything scratchy that will be stitched in at the neckline.
  • Test the materials you are using before sewing into the garment/accessory to make sure they are colorfast. This is especially true for fabric markers – it’s best to make sure the ink doesn’t run before the label is stitched into a favorite sweater.

The label pictured above is made from 100% cotton fabric, a leftover scrap from another project. The edges were turned under and stitched in place using a running stitch. When I tack it down, I will incorporate a bit of ribbon.

Have fun!

Handmade cotton clothing label laying on mittens

Finding Calm – Part 2 – Read, Watch, Listen, Explore

Up close image of embroidered arcs

During the past week, I’ve actually spent time in my studio creating several small pieces with lots of handwork. It’s been quite nice after what seems like days of not being able to focus on anything. That said, with the week ahead in this country, I have a feeling that this focus will wax and wane. So, like last week’s post, I am sharing a list of resources to turn to when you are looking for calm, creative fuel and a break from the news…

Read

  • My husband is currently taking a continuing ed class where he learned that “even knitting” is good for your brain health because it speaks to the complex physical movements our brain was evolved to accomplish. This dovetailed with an interview I heard on NPR’s Fresh Air with Dr. Sanjay Gupta on his new book, Keep Sharp. I’ve added it to my reading list and will keep knitting and sewing!

Watch and Listen

Last night I watched the excellent new movie One Night in Miami, a fictionalized account of a 1964 meeting in a Miami hotel between friends Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Sam Cooke and Malcolm X. Read a review here and read more about the meeting here. It is streaming on Amazon. After watching the movie, I had to pull out “Sam Cooke: The Man Who Invented Soul” from our stack of CDs. Issued in 2000, it’s still available (but the price has gone way up since I purchased) or check with your local library or streaming service to access.

Explore

Transforming ordinary materials into something beautiful is an idea that has always fascinated me. Paper folding of any kind leaves me in awe, whether snowflakes made from white copier paper or complex shapes made from beautiful, unique papers. If you’ve not seen Between the Folds, a PBS Independent Lens documentary that came out in 2008, I suggest adding it to your list. It is available for streaming on Amazon – see the trailer here.

Then check out this article on 31 artists who transform sheets of paper into incredible works of art. Three of my favorites – the breath-taking gigantic paper flower by artist Tiffanie Turner, the paper feathers by artist Parth Kothekar, and the ramen (see video at bottom of article) produced by Papermeal. Then grab a piece of paper and start folding – there are lots of tutorials and books (including this one by Tiffanie Turner) to provide further inspiration and instruction!

Finding Calm – Read, Listen, Explore, Cook

Grey and yellow quilt that is basted together with black thread

It’s hard to write a post about making and creativity after the dark week we’ve just witnessed in Washington, D.C. It’s also been hard to keep my focus in the studio this week on anything that requires focused attention, like measuring, cutting and sewing.

Even though it might be hard to believe right now, as I’ve said before, art, nature and physical work (think shoveling snow or cleaning your home like never before) can help provide the space to process difficult events, manage anxiety, and find peace, if only for a few hours. And, these same outlets can help lead us back out to the world to do our work, advocate for positive change, etc.

This week I’m sharing a list of go-to’s that I’ve turned to over the last few weeks…

Read

I’ve been recommending Jane Smiley’s new book, Perestroika in Paris: A Novel, to all my friends in the last month. It’s a lovely story – the pacing is perfect for the times we are living through right now. No big drama, likable characters, and a great story. I borrowed it from my local library but if I had purchased, it would go on my shelf of all-time favorite books. Find it at your local library or bookstore, or check it out here.

Listen

  • “Appalachian Spring” by composer Aaron Copland premiered in 1944. Whether you are a classical music fan or not, this is a beautiful, uplifting piece. Learn more about it here and listen to it here.
  • A CD I’ve pulled from the shelf several times when I just really want to forget the outside world is “Elton John’s Greatest Hits.” Crank the volume and sing along! Check it out here or your favorite music streaming service.
  • Next up on my podcast playlist is Powerful Women: Let’s Talk about women doing good things in the world. There are only 27 episodes as of now so if you like it, it’s doable to go back and listen to all the episodes.

Explore

  • If you can, get outside and explore parks, hiking paths and other outdoor spaces in your area.
  • Online, many museums are offering virtual exhibits. Check out your favorite museums as well as ones you’ve yet to explore in person. One of my favorite museums in Chicago is the American Writers Museum. Opened in May 2017 after years of planning, it is deceptively small. While it has a small footprint relative to other museums, I spent several hours exploring the day I visited.

Cook

  • A big steaming bowl of soup, accompanied by a grilled cheese sandwich on occasion, is my go-to comfort food. And, holy cow, I’ve been making a lot lately – usually on Sunday afternoons for a simple evening meal that we can also have for lunch throughout the week. Make up your favorite recipe(s), then sit back and enjoy each and every bite.
  • If you’re looking for a new recipe, my husband and I are both crazy about the Simple Red Lentil Soup with Spinach, Lemon, and Pepper from At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin. And, if you’re not sure about lentils, red lentils are wonderful – in this soup, they dissolve into a creamy, thick stock. Divine. Here’s a link to the recipe – and an interview with Amy Chaplin – on the Food Network site.

NOTE: The image at the top is from a small quilt that is in process. The working title keeps changing… Today, it is “Sun Peaking Through the Clouds.”

Keeping it Simple in the New Year

Potholders made with colorful loops and loom

We are starting a new year with the same concerns and challenges of 2020. In years past, I have kicked off the new year with an ambitious studio project – a large bed quilt, an intricate embroidery piece, or a series of projects for upcoming classes. This year I decided to start simple, knowing the larger, more complex projects are around the corner.

To begin, I dug into some of my daughter’s crafting supplies from years ago and found several yards of blanket fleece. In about 90 minutes, I had made a tied edge fleece blanket, start to finish, for friends’ 3-year old child. Perfect for cuddling under after a day of play in the snow. A straight-forward, simple project. You can find instructions here.

Recently, I also found my daughter’s potholder loom and some leftover loops (from hers and mine!), so in the days leading up to 2021, I also made a few potholders. Again, simple, useful and done in less than an hour. Another plus – I’ve stashed several away to pair with tea and baked goods to give away to friends and family. If your potholder loom is long gone, check with your local art/craft store to see if they have any in stock. If not, here’s a link to Purl Soho’s kit. Both the potholders and the fleece blanket projects are fun to do solo and with kids.

So, as we enter another roller coaster year of experiences and emotions, take on those big, ambitious, boundary-pushing projects for sure but intersperse some smaller ones in there as well. This practice also applies not just to what you are making but also to what you may be doing at work and in your community: )

Happy making in the year ahead ~

Purple Fleece Blanket with Bicycle Motif

Stitch Up a Winter Classic: Flannel Pajama Bottoms

Green flannel with pine and berry print and the book Weekend Sewing by Heather Ross

Fabric, maker supplies, and books compete for shelf space in our house. We depend on the local library for many books but some you just gotta have – like Heather Ross’ classic Weekend Sewing: More Than 40 Projects and Ideas for Inspired Stitching. A mix of clothing (adults, kids and babies), accessories, and home goods patterns, it is my go-to for pajama bottoms. When teaching my daughter to sew, I leaned into this pattern several times. It’s a good one for learning a bit about fit and getting comfy sewing straight seams and slight curves.

If you’re looking for gift ideas that can be stitched in a few hours, the pajama bottoms take about 2-1/2 hours to make, start to finish. Or, if you’re looking for a gift for a sewist – beginner or experienced – bundle Weekend Sewing or another pajama bottom pattern with flannel fabric.

A note: Weekend Sewing was first published 2009 but is still available. Check with your local bookseller or find it on Amazon. There are plenty of pajama patterns out there, double-check before purchasing to make sure the pattern includes your size.

With presents finished and ready to go out the door, I’m finally getting around to making a pair of pajama bottoms for myself using flannel purchased years ago! Happy sewing!

Martha Mae-A Favorite Destination for Art Supplies and Inspiration

Unwrapped package with notecard

Once in awhile, you walk into a store and feel transported to another world. Martha Mae: Art Supplies & Beautiful Things is one such place.

Last winter, about this time, I discovered Martha Mae in Chicago’s Andersonville neighborhood. Though not large, my husband and I spent well over an hour in there ticking through our holiday shopping list and finding gifts for artists and those who haven’t picked up a box of paints or sketchpad in years. We were not about to leave until we had looked, touched and tested our way through the store – yes, “tested.” Trying to decide between different pencils, we were invited to try them out at the back counter. Martha Mae, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel and the store’s namesake, was curled up in his basket sleeping away despite a bustling store – just so darn cute!

Flash forward from last year to this and, like so many other businesses, Martha Mae was forced to close its brick and mortar store because of the pandemic. The store has moved 100% online.

A couple of weeks ago, I popped onto the website to make a couple of gift purchases, and the box arrived a few days later. When I opened it, I was immediately wowed by all the care they had taken to package my treasures (eco-friendly, too!). For a few minutes, it was as if I was standing at the back counter waiting for my purchases. Tucked in a small bag were several items including a small watercolor of a kumquat with a hand-written thank you note on the back. In this era where we hunger for in-person gatherings, these little touches were so appreciated.

On this small business Saturday, shop local and be sure to check out stores that may have moved from Main Street to just online. And if you are looking for art supplies or a beautiful gift – especially for that hard-to-buy-for-person – check out Martha Mae. Oh, and my favorites at the store… Beam Paints, all the inks, and the Moon Calendars.

Celebrate Fall with Felt Leaves

Felt leaves on white cake stand

Fall is my favorite season – the crisp temperatures, beautiful colors, warming foods like hearty stews and ginger cookies. And, a reminder to spend as much time outside as possible before winter arrives with its plunging temperatures!

To extend the fall season in your home and capture the beauty of the season, whip up some felt leaves that make use of leftover scraps from past projects. They look great placed under a table centerpiece – think ceramic pumpkins, a glass candle holder, or a vase of branches gathered on a walk. Other ideas:

  • Add a magnet to the back of the stitched leaves and stick on your refrigerator – then rearrange often!
  • Stitch the leaves to a ribbon using a small tacking stitch and string up on the fireplace mantle or a bookshelf.
  • Cut a rectangle from burlap or heavy canvas, arrange the leaves in a random pattern, and stitch in place using a tacking stitch in several places on each leaf. Then, hang on the front door or someplace in the house where you can enjoy.

Here’s the how to:

Step 1: Collect felt scraps in fall colors – oranges, reds, browns, yellows greens. Then, get ready to play with the color, shape, thread color and stitching.

Step 2: Sketch out an assortment of leaf patterns based on trees that are real or imagined. Or, download leaf coloring pages from the Internet and use these as your patterns.

Step 3: For each leaf, cut out two sizes. The larger one should be about 1/4″ bigger all around than the smaller one. Enjoy the process of playing with the colors – make some leaves that high contrast, others with less – to see what you like best. Creating a mix of leaf combinations will help keep it interesting (IMO).

Step 4: Place the smaller leaf on top of the larger one in each leaf pair and pin in place to hold while you are stitching.

Step 5: Stitch the two leaves together to emphasize the overall shape and vein pattern. You have many options here for stitching: hand stitching using different embroidery stitches or a simple running stitch; machine stitching that takes advantage of your machine’s capabilities or a simple straight stitch (as I did here). If you are hand stitching the leaves together, you can use embroidery floss, perle cotton, or heavy sewing thread. NOTE: You can use a pencil to lightly mark your stitching pattern on the felt so that you can cover it with your stitches. Alternatively, use the edge and curve of the leaf to inform the placement of your stitches.

Step 6: Have fun, use and enjoy!

Sharing the making experience with others:

Here are some ideas for adapting the project if you are short on time or materials, have a little one who wants to participate in the leaf-making fun…

  • Glue the leaves together, then “make stitches” with a Sharpie.
  • Use a big needle and big stitches to hand sew the leaves together.
  • Divide the steps up to match each person’s age, skill level and/or interest.
  • Use heavy card stock or construction paper instead of felt. Then, using markers, draw the stitching pattern on the leaves.

Unplugging to Create and Explore

Brown and Orange striped knitted scarf

Election Day seems to be a good day to post about the break I’ve taken in this space, especially since I’m trying to tune out the news for at least part of the day. So, about that break…

My studio is where I go to create, express ideas, find peace, and get lost in the flow. Occasionally, it feels more like work than play – usually a sign that my creativity is tapped out. So, I took a break – or, as I like to say, cleared the table for awhile. Critical was unplugging from social media and engaging in activities that I find restorative:

  • Playing with color and texture. Finding a box of yarn for a sweater that I know I will never knit started me down this path. Now, 4-1/2 scarves later, I’ve got some ideas for future quilts and embroidered pieces – and gifts for my family.
  • Sketching found objects. When out on walks, I like to pick up leaves, acorns and other items lying on the ground. When the objects are too big or stationary (like tree bark), I snap a picture and then begin sketching at home. My sketches are not how you might see it, but they are as I see and interpret the object. Again, more ideas going into the creative tank.
  • Breaking out of a cooking rut to make some pretty terrific meals. There have been a couple of flops so not all has been perfect but I am learning and my taste buds are quite happy. The meal we are still talking about: Zuni Cafe’s Roasted Chicken with Bread Salad. I’ve never eaten at this San Francisco restaurant but I know exactly what I’d order!
  • Connecting with family and friends via phone, Zoom, or in person. It is amazing how much your schedule opens up when you unplug. All of sudden, you have a bit more time – and energy – to connect with people one-on-one. One blustery, chilly day we sat around our friends’ table to enjoy a great meal and conversation, then watched My Octopus Teacher. (We first checked to make sure we had been following CDC guidelines when it comes to social distancing.)
  • Steeping myself in nature. Walks, sitting outside – even with a blanket wrapped tightly round – or just opening a window and taking a deep breath in to connect with the natural world.

I am working on making these activities daily/weekly habits to keep my creative tank from becoming depleted again. I’ve also established more clear boundaries around social media – checking in once or twice a day for 30 minutes or less and unplugging during the weekends. Exceptions will happen but that’s what they will be, not the norm. Focusing and prioritizing those things that matter most – like family, friendships and my creative practice – will get the most attention.

So, on this big day, go vote if you have not already. Next, unplug to find a few minutes to slow down and do what restores you on a regular basis. Then starting at home, create and do to build a better world for today and for future generations, a world that unites, is kind and inclusive, is built on science and truth.

Transforming Envelopes into Art

Quilt block stitched to white Tyvek Envelope

If you look at a Tyvek mailing envelope up close, you see what looks like iridescent fibers and feels like a cross between paper and cloth. Manufactured by DuPont, Tyvek is a non-woven material, and according to their website, is made of “100% high density polyethylene fibers randomly laid and compressed to form a remarkably tough printing substrate that is ideal for applications where durability and tear resistance is of prime importance.” You’ll find it in building materials, envelopes, reusable bags, building signs…

I like Tyvek for its water-proof properties, especially when mailing something important (like fabric or taxes) And, I feel guilty every time I send or receive something in a mailer, even though DuPont says it’s a recyclable material.

So, when a package arrived the other day in a Tyvek envelope, I decided to extend its life in a new direction: Using it and few scraps of fabric from an earlier project, I made a small quilt block, then stitched it to a piece of Tyvek. I wrote a get-well message on the back and will mail it to a friend tomorrow.

Here are the steps:

  1. Gather some fabric pieces and a used Tyvek envelope.
  2. Design your quilt block. Consider incorporating envelope seams, stamps, and the postage mark into the design. Also consider how you intend to use the finished piece. For example, will you write a message on the back and mail to a friend, tack it on your inspiration board…
  3. Cut out your pieces, allowing for a 1/4″ seam allowance. For the one-patch quilt pattern in the photo, I cut 4 squares (2 from each fabric) measuring 2″ x 2″.
  4. Stitch the block pieces together (1/4″ seam allowance) using a needle and thread or sewing machine.
  5. Stitch the block to a piece of Tyvek. Use tape to hold the block in place while stitching, removing it before the needle pierces the tape. This prevents the needle from getting gummed up. (Note: Pins will leave a permanent hole in the Tyvek, so tape works best.)
  6. Use a longer stitch length – or decorative stitch to add a border around the block. Be sure to use tacking stitches at beginning and end so that the stitches don’t pull out.

Several additional notes to keep in mind:

  • Do not iron the Tyvek – only finger press – because it will melt if your iron is hot enough.
  • You can paint Tyvek with acrylic or fabric paints. Just paint, wipe off any excess and then let dry before using in your project.
  • If you are writing on the back, test on a scrap of the envelope first to make sure the ink does not soak through onto your block – or that your message does not smear. I wrote on the back using a Uni-Ball Signo fine point gel pen (0.28mm tip).

To see other ideas on how to transform mailers into something both useful and beautiful, check out Reinvention: Sewing with Rescued Materials by Maya Donenfeld, available through your local bookstore and, hopefully, library.